What does a thyroid cough feel like?

Table of contents:

  1. What does a thyroid cough feel like?
  2. Can Graves disease cause coughing?
  3. Can hyperthyroidism cause lung problems?
  4. Is breathing problem related to thyroid?
  5. Can hyperthyroidism cause chest tightness?
  6. Can hyperthyroidism affect your heart?
  7. How do you diagnose hyperthyroidism?

What does a thyroid cough feel like?

For most people, this cough is a dry, hacking sort of cough.” In addition to cough, thyroid growth can lead to pressing on the vocal cords and a hoarse voice, or pressing on the esophagus and difficulty swallowing food. You may also notice swelling or pain in the front of your lower neck, and even into your ears.

Can Graves disease cause coughing?

Goiters related to Graves' disease are called diffuse thyrotoxic goiters. These goiters can be small lumps or they can be large. A goiter can make swallowing difficult. If it's big enough, it can also cause you to cough and may make it more difficult for you to sleep.

Can hyperthyroidism cause lung problems?

Many thyroid diseases can lead to pulmonary problems, including hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, nodular goiter, and thyroid cancer. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism cause respiratory muscle weakness and decrease pulmonary function.

Is breathing problem related to thyroid?

Breathing Problems Severe low thyroid can weaken the muscles that help you breathe. Some experts think this is why hypothyroidism can lead to pauses in your breathing while you sleep, a condition called sleep apnea.

Can hyperthyroidism cause chest tightness?

People with hyperthyroidism may also have high blood pressure. In a person with clogged, stiff heart arteries, the combination of a forceful heartbeat and elevated blood pressure may lead to chest pain or angina.

Can hyperthyroidism affect your heart?

Some of the most serious complications of hyperthyroidism involve the heart. These include a rapid heart rate, a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation that increases your risk of stroke, and congestive heart failure — a condition in which your heart can't circulate enough blood to meet your body's needs.

How do you diagnose hyperthyroidism?

Blood tests that measure thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) can confirm the diagnosis. High levels of thyroxine and low or nonexistent amounts of TSH indicate an overactive thyroid. The amount of TSH is important because it's the hormone that signals your thyroid gland to produce more thyroxine.